Researchers at Newcastle University report a significant advance in the continuous production and collection of cells. The process removes the limit on the number of cells that can be grown in a culture dish, which previously was determined by its surface area, according to the scientists.

The study (“Developing a Continuous Bioprocessing Approach to Stromal Cell Manufacture”), published in  ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces,  describes how the team developed a coating that allows individual stromal cells to “peel away” from the surface on which they are grown. This results in more space so that additional cells can continuously grow in their place. The process works across a range of stromal cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).

“To this day, the concept of continuous bioprocessing has been applied mostly to the manufacture of molecular biologics such as proteins, growth factors, and secondary metabolites with biopharmaceutical uses. The present work now sets …