Scientists in the U.S. have grown mouse skin tissue complete with hair follicles (HFs) directly from mouse pluripotent stem cells (mPSCs). The hairy skin more closely resembles natural mouse skin than existing lab-grown tissue that is constructed by piecing together different cell types. The Indiana University School of Medicine researchers suggest that if hair-growing human skin can be generated using a similar approach, it could provide an important model for studying disease or for evaluating new drugs. “It could be potentially a superior model for testing drugs, or looking at things like the development of skin cancers, within an environment that’s more representative of the in vivo microenvironment,“ comments Karl Koehler, Ph.D., an assistant professor of otolaryngology–head and neck surgery. “And it would allow us to limit the number of animals we use for research.”

Lead author Jiyoon Lee, Ph.D., together with Dr. Koehler and colleagues report on …