Scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a protein called TEAD1 that appears to regulate the migration of human glioblastoma cells away from the primary brain tumor mass, into other areas of the brain. Their studies, reported in Nature Communications , found that knocking out the TEAD1 gene in patient-derived glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells grown in vitro  and transplanted into mice inhibited the cancer cells’ ability to proliferate and reduced the rate of cell migration. The researchers suggest that the findings could feasibly lead to new therapeutic approaches that either increase the success of surgery to remove the tumor, or at least help to hold back tumor recurrence.

“Our study is one of the first to take human patient glioblastoma cells directly from the tumor immediately after surgery and isolate the most aggressive tumor subclones—the glioma stem cells—to specifically characterize the machinery responsible …