Researchers at the  Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center  say they have identified a gene in laboratory experiments that fuels the biological processes that cause the different types of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) that physicians see in patients. 

MDS is linked to a number of different gene mutations and is considered one of the most complex malignancies affecting blood-making hematopoietic stem cells in bone marrow. These blood disorders cause people to have immature, malfunctioning bone marrow cells that lead to a diverse set of health problems, including leukemia. The team’s study (“ Pathobiologic Pseudohypoxia as a Putative Mechanism Underlying Myelodysplastic Syndromes ”) appears in Cancer Discovery .

“MDS are heterogeneous hematopoietic disorders that are incurable with conventional therapy. The incidence is increasing with global population aging. Although many genetic, epigenetic, splicing, and metabolic aberrations have been identified in MDS patients, their clinical features are quite similar. Here we show that hypoxia-independent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor …